Organic Energy

Choose your required unit size from the dropdown menu below. Volume discounts work out as follows:

1.5Kg: £1.86 per 100g

3.0Kg: £1.59 per 100g

4.5Kg: £1.49 per 100g

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Product Highlights

  • Virtually Flavourless
  • Highly Versatile Complex Carbohydrate Powder
  • Part of the TORQ Recovery systemTM
  • Use as a Flavourless Energy Drink
  • Add to Food to Boost Carbohydrate Content
  • Soil Association Certified Organic

Product Summary

TORQ energy organic is made from an ingredient called maltodextrin, often referred to as a glucose polymer. A glucose polymer’s molecular profile optimises the long-term energy providing properties of complex carbohydrates, with low osmolality in the gut, without the need to consume bulky starch-rich foods. These bulky foods take a longer time to digest because they contain fibre, which is important to consume as part of a healthy balanced diet an important, but is a metabolically useless nutrient when it comes to fuelling performance whilst exercising. Fibrous foods also fill and bloat your stomach making movement and sport in particular more difficult.

Product Usage

TORQ Energy Organic is a highly versatile product. It has the density and energy of sugar, yet it has little or no sweetness. This makes it a very important product within the TORQ Recovery System, because it can be added to sweet and savoury recipes ‘invisibly’ to add carbohydrate calories. This is especially important during periods of high load exercise and training where carbohydrate intake at rest becomes critical to performance. 4 level scoops of TORQ Energy Organic mixed into a cup of soup will be barely noticeable, yet it will have increased its carbohydrate content to that of a large bowl of pasta.

TORQ Energy Organic can be added to your breakfast cereal, to tea or coffee or can simply be mixed into a pint glass with fruit juice or squash. The calories are hidden and very easy to consume. This wouldn’t be ideal for weight loss of course, but it certainly offers huge benefits to the athlete struggling to reach energy balance during stage racing or during a training camp.

TORQ Energy Organic can also be simply mixed with water (1 scoop per 250ml) to create an organic unflavoured energy drink and this is incredibly popular with people who don’t like strong flavours but realise they need to hydrate and fuel themselves during exercise.

Nutritional Info

Energy Organic

Ingredients: Maltodextrin (Polysacharide 93%, Maltose 3%, Maltotriose 3%, Dextrose 1%).

per 500ml per 750ml per 1000ml per 100g
Energy (kJ) 512 767 1023 1620
Energy (Kcal) 121 181 241 382
Fat (g) 0 0 0 0
of which saturates (g) 0 0 0 0
Carbohydrates (g) 30 45 60 95
of which sugars (g) 0.3 0.5 0.6 1
Fibre (g) 0 0 0 0
Protein (g) 0 0 0 0

Allergy Information: There are no nuts in this recipe and the product is packed in a nut-free environment, however we cannot guarantee that nuts are not handled by staff or visitors on the factory premises. No gluten containing ingredients are used in this product.

No Preservatives // No Colours // No Artificial Sweeteners // Natural Flavouring // Wheat-Free // Dairy-Free // Suitable for Vegans

Tested under ISO 17025 for the presence of prohibited substances.

If you have any questions in the meantime, please don’t hesitate in contacting us on enquiries@torqfitness.co.uk or on local-rate (from landlines) 0344 332 0852.

References

  1. Stellingwerff, T & Cox, GR. (2014)
    Systematic review: Carbohydrate supplementation on exercise performance or capacity of varying durations. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2014 Sep;39(9):998-1011.
  2. Wilson. PB., Ingraham, SJ. (2015)
    Glucose-fructose likely improves gastrointestinal comfort and endurance running performance relative to glucose-only. Scand J Med Sci Sports. [Epub ahead of print].
  3. Currell, K & Jeukendrup, A.E. (2008)
    Superior endurance performance with ingestion of multiple transportable carbohydrates. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 40(2):275–81.
  4. Triplett, D., Doyle, D., Rupp, J., Benardot, D. (2010)
    An isocaloric glucose-fructose beverage’s effect on simulated 100-km cycling performance compared with a glucose-only beverage. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 20(2):122–31
  5. Tarpey, M.D., Roberts, J.D., Kass, L.S., Tarpey, R.J., Roberts, M.G. (2013)
    The ingestion of protein with a maltodextrin and fructose beverage on substrate utilisation and exercise performance. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 38(12):1245–53.
  6. Rowlands, D.S., Swift, M., Ros, M., Green, J.G. (2012)
    Composite versus single transportable carbohydrate solution enhances race and laboratory cycling performance. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 37(3):425–36.
  7. Baur, D.A., Schroer, A.B., Luden, N.D., Womack, C.J., Smyth, S.A., Saunders, M.J. (2014)
    Glucose-fructose enhances performance versus isocaloric, but not moderate, glucose. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 46(9):1778–86.
  8. Rowlands, D.S., Thorburn, M.S., Thorp, R.M., Broadbent, S.M., Shi, X. (2008)
    Effect of graded fructose co-ingestion with maltodextrin on exogenous 14C-fructose and 13C-glucose oxidation efficiency and high-intensity cycling performance. J Appl Physiol. 104:1709–19.
  9. O’Brien, W.J & Rowlands, D.S. (2011)
    Fructose-maltodextrin ratio in a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution differentially affects exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rate, gut comfort, and performance. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 300(1):G181–9.
  10. O’Brien, W.J., Stannard, S.R., Clarke, J.A., Rowlands, D.S. (2013)
    Fructose–maltodextrin ratio governs exogenous and other CHO oxidation and performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 45(9):1814–24.
  11. Rowlands, D.S., Swift, M., Ros, M., Green, J.G. (2012)
    Composite versus single transportable carbohydrate solution enhances race and laboratory cycling performance. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism. 37(3): 425-436.
  12. Smith, J.W., Pascoe, D.D., Passe, D., Ruby, B.C., Stewart, L.K., Baker, L.B., et al. (2013)
    Curvilinear dose-response relationship of carbohydrate (0–120 g·h−1) and performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 45(2):336–41.
  13. Roberts, J.D., Tarpey, M.D., Kass, L.S., Tarpey, R.J., Roberts, M.G. (2014)
    Assessing a commercially available sports drink on exogenous carbohydrate oxidation, fluid delivery and sustained exercise performance. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 11(1):1–14.
  14. Jentjens, R.L., Underwood, K., Achten, J., Currell, K., Mann, C.H., Jeukendrup, A.E. (2006)
    Exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates are elevated after combined ingestion of glucose and fructose during exercise in the heat. J Appl Physiol. 100(3):807–16.
  15. Jeukendrup, A.E & Moseley, L. (2010)
    Multiple transportable carbohydrates enhance gastric emptying and fluid delivery. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 20(1):112–21.
  16. Davis, J.M., Burgess, W.A., Slentz, C.A., Bartoli, W.P. (1990)
    Fluid availability of sports drinks differing in carbohydrate type and concentration. Am J Clin Nutr. 51(6):1054–7.
  17. Jentjens, R.L., Venables, M.C., Jeukendrup, A.E. (2004)
    Oxidation of exogenous glucose, sucrose, and maltose during prolonged cycling exercise. J Appl Physiol. 96(4):1285–91.
  18. Jentjens, R.L., Achten, J., Jeukendrup, A.E. (2004)
    High oxidation rates from combined carbohydrates ingested during exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 36(9):1551–8.
  19. Wallis, G.A., Rowlands, D.S., Shaw, C., Jentjens, R.L., Jeukendrup, A.E. (2005)
    Oxidation of combined ingestion of maltodextrins and fructose during exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 37(3):426–32.
  20. Jentjens, R.L., Moseley, L., Waring, R.H., Harding, L.K., Jeukendrup, A.E. (2004)
    Oxidation of combined ingestion of glucose and fructose during exercise. J Appl Physiol. 96(4):1277–84.
  21. Jentjens, R.L & Jeukendrup, A.E. (2005)
    High rates of exogenous carbohydrate oxidation from a mixture of glucose and fructose ingested during prolonged cycling exercise. Brit J Nutr. 93:485–92.
  22. Fuchs, C.J., Gonzalez, J.T., Beelen, M., Cermak, N.M., Smith, F.E., Thelwall, P.E., Taylor, R., Trenell, M.I., Stevenson, E.J., van Loon, L.J. (2016)
    Sucrose ingestion after exhaustive exercise accelerates liver, but not muscle glycogen repletion compared with glucose ingestion in trained athletes. J Appl Physi. [Epub ahead of print].

For reviews see…

Jeukendrup, A.E. (2010) Carbohydrate and exercise performance: the role of multiple transportable carbohydrates. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. Jul;13(4):452-7.

Rowlands, D.S., Houltham, S., Musa-Veloso, K., Brown, F., Paulionis, L., Bailey, D. (2015) Fructose-Glucose Composite Carbohydrates and Endurance Performance: Critical Review and Future Perspectives. Sports Med. Nov;45(11):1561-76.